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Thread: Meter value meenings

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    3

    Default Meter value meenings

    So so new to this, anything you can share will help. We have a Hanna HI-98103 Ph meter (cheap) and a Martini EC59 EC TDS and Temperature meter. We have learned how to take readings and have no idea what guide lines to use as to when EC is to high or low and the same with the PPM. The Ph is a snap as all plants have their favorite range and we try to stay close to mid range but the EC & PPM is another story. Is there a EC,PPM for Dummies or some other simple read that we could try? Nutrients are not free and we would like to learn how to get the most from them and still get maximum growth.
    First Post so please forgive mistakes. John

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    22

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    EC & PPM are measures of Electrical Conductivity in water. Electrical Conductivity increases and decreases as salt content in the water increases and decreases. That being said, EC and PPM meters read Electrical Conductivity of a solution and turn it into a relative number. EC meters give you a measurement of the solutions Electrical Conductivity and PPM meters turn that reading into a general number trying to represent the amount of salts in the solution (Parts Per Million).

    a general range for EC can be 1.0ish for early veg and going all the way up to 2.0 for strong final bloom.

    a general range for PPM can be 400-600 for early veg going all the way up to 1600-2000 for strong final bloom.

    the most important thing is to watch your plants to see how they respond to EC/PPM levels, especially for your first few rounds until you figure out exactly how your plants handle it. not all plants like the same range.

    one of the most important things to take into consideration is that PPM and EC meters are not giving you a reading of individual nutrients like Nitrogen or Calcium, but rather a more general reading of how much total nutrients are in your solution. PPM and EC meters read ALL salts in water, so if you are using tap or non-filtered/non-RO water, there will be a EC/PPM value that will add to your final reading. also, PPM & EC meters only read salts, so if you are using organic based nutrients, your reading will not be accurate or consistent at all since they are not derived from salts like chemical nutriens are.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3

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    That is what we were looking for, some kind of a general value. The EC meter we have is a nice unit and reads to 5000. With a start of around 2400 with fresh nutrients in RO with around 1200 for PPM the Ph will be around 6.5 to start. The Ph climbs as the days add up and we try to add Ph down daily to hold it below 7.0. That is not a problem, the deal we have trouble with is when to change. The plants do not show a lag in growth as fast as the meter will show excessive salts that hinder growth so we wanted to know what to look for like "what is to high" so we could keep water at a good level of EC. Thanks again, this will give us some values to work with and learn for our self how each plant reacts to EC & PPM. It would be great if there were a reading somewhere that told you the changes in values from start to when to change the fluid. Old Aircraft mechanic thinking, sorry. What a great new hobby, retarded,retired, & relaxed --- more everyday.

    Thanks, John

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    31

    Default

    BG wrote up an article what shows what plants generally need as they develop by weeks.

    http://www.bghydro.com/BGH/static/ar...0406_tdspH.asp

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